Classical Media & Salts for Cell Culture



Renato Dulbecco, Salk Institute

 

It is a testament to Dulbecco, Eagle, Ringer and other pioneering physicians and scientists that the media formulations they developed are still widely in use today.

Media variations have been refined in response to the need for physiologically-relevant environments for diverse mammalian cell cultures. Whether you're growing adherent suspension phenotypes, with or without FBS, need high- or low-glutamine, ready-to-use liquid or easy-to-store powder – you'll find just what you need for cell culture here. These media and salts, along with their components, have been qualified for cell culture applications, and are manufactured in our state-of-the art facilities.

 

 

 

DMEM Media
Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium contains more amino acids, vitamins, and glucose than MEM. Find the exact format and formulation your cells depend on.

 

 

DMEM/F12 Media
Need a serum-free solution? Our DMEM/F12 media is available with or without HEPES, glutamine, phenol red — all in liquid or powdered formats.

 

 

Medium 199
Originally an animal-free, defined medium, Medium 199 is now widely used in virology, vaccine production, and primary tissue explant culture.

 

 

Basal Salts
D-PBS, Hanks' Earle's, Tyrode's — you'll find the perfect formulation for your culture application in the most complete collection of balanced salts available anywhere.

 

 

MEM
Developed by Dr. Harry Eagle working at the NIH, MEM or Minimum Essential Medium contains essential amino acids universal to multispecies needs.

 

 

More Classical Media
Find specialized formulations including Ames', Iscove's and Glasgow modifications, plus Click's, Fischer's, L-15, McCoy's, NCTC, and more.

 

 

RPMI 1640 media
Named for the Roswell Park institute, RPMI 1640 media is optimized for culturing non-adherent cell types, such as lymphocytes & other blood cells.

 

 

Ham's F-10 & F-12 Media
Optimized to support the growth of CHO cells, Ham's media are also suited for hepatocyte culture, viral fusion, and toxicity assays, to name just a few.